Call for papers: Interface

For the next issue of Soapbox we invite young researchers and established scholars alike to submit academic essays or creative work that critically engages with the theme of interface. We are inviting extended proposals (500-1000 words) that follow the MLA formatting and referencing style. We don't charge a submission fee.

Send your proposal to submissions@soapboxjournal.net by December 5th, 2021.*
Mediation by Murray Gibson, 2020. Gobelins tapestry, wool and cotton, 25 x 25 cm. Image courtesy of the artist: murraygibsontapestry.com

An interface is a space of contact and interconnection. Thinking within but also beyond a media studies framework, we can understand our lives to be constantly mediated by interfaces of one form or another. Broadly speaking, they serve as an intermediary between an individual and a system, or alternatively conceptualised, between experience and infrastructure. Interfaces mediate between a body and its environment, private and public, subject and object. In each instance, the interface enables interaction and activity. Think of the movement from print to digital media, the structural design of spaces and buildings, the reception of knowledge from an academic paper: as we move through the world we encounter and interact with a range of interfaces that delineate the possibilities of experience in profound ways. Their politics can be intentionally designed or inherently implicated in their operations. As such, interfaces are cultural as well as political: they connect us to a matrix of histories and structures while their imbrication in power can afford and advance the needs of one group at the expense of another. 

WITHIN AND BEYOND A DEFINITION

Interface (noun/verb)
in·​ter·​face |  \ ˈin-tər-ˌfās \

In a highly mediated world, the most immediate image of an interface is as a programmed screen or device that facilitates a connection between a real-time user and a digital non-user. Here, the interface is a site of communication and translation, but also the boundary that differentiates two bodies, spaces, or phases. Can the interface operate as a verb beyond its noun form?

We invite you to think through and beyond the somatechnic view of the interface, allowing perspectives that explore the aesthetic, infrastructural, affective, material, and political dimensions of the interfaces that give shape to contemporary experience. 

* We do not charge a submission fee

FULL CALL FOR PAPERS

LAUNCH ISSUE 2.0.: CONTAMINATION

March 31, 2021
Stepan Lipatov and Sissel V. Møller

We are thrilled to announce the launch of our issue 2.0 Contamination.

A year ago, we singled out contamination as the common thread traversing the events, conversations, and research unfolding within our networks. At the time, contamination had not yet embedded itself into our thoughts and actions as a virus overwriting all else. There is not only a conceptual need but a physical inevitability to re-configure the meaning and effects of ‘contamination’.

Please join us for a conversation with a group of our contributors, where they will present their unique approaches to ‘contamination.’ Taking into account how the past months may have influenced their views, the discussion will reflect on the concepts of: home, intimacy, and the commons.

  • Susana Fabre – “Surrogating Monsters”
  • David Maroto – “Hybridisation, Impurity, Contamination: The Emergence of the Artist’s Novel”
  • Ayoub Tannaoui – “Connecting Biological Processes, Lived Experience and The Production of
    Knowledge: A Biosemiotic Analysis of Allergy”
  • Jeppe Dall Gregersen – “Between Transformation and Contamination: Material Imitation in Laminate Tabletops”

Moderated by Lijuan Klassen

You can pre-order 2.0 Contamination here.


Thanks to the contributors, peer reviewers, collaborators, and friends whose continuous work and patience in the oddest of times made this possible.

Special thanks to our brilliant designers: Stepan Lipatov and Sissel V. Møller.

With the kind support of the NICA (Netherland Institute for Cultural Analysis) and the Uva department of Literary Studies.

BUY THIS ISSUE

ORDER ISSUE 2.0.: CONTAMINATION

April 13, 2021
WEBSHOP
News

Contribute

Soapbox is an open access publication platform offering two different means for publishing: our print journal and our online platform. We encourage the exploration of how to practice cultural analysis across a wide variety of media—textual, visual and/or auditive. When submitting you agree to our copyright and publishing terms and conditions. Please go over our guidelines before submitting. 

JOURNAL

We publish a yearly double-blind, peer-reviewed journal featuring interdisciplinary scholarship. Our focus lies mainly on academic research papers, however, as a cultural analysis platform we also encourage creative work (e.g., creative nonfiction, visual, graphic, and photography series, etc.). 

Call for Papers

For the next issue of Soapbox we invite young researchers and established scholars alike to submit academic essays or creative work that critically engages with the theme of interface. We are inviting  extended proposals (500-1000 words) that follow the MLA formatting and referencing style to be submitted to submissions@soapboxjournal.net by December 5th, 2021.

Read our call for papers

ONLINE

Our digital platform accepts submissions of a variety of formats all year round. We look for engaging, original work—written, visual or auditory—on a variety of cultural topics, whether of an academic or more experimental nature. Ultimately, our online platform intends to showcase the development of ideas traditionally explored in academia in order to apply and translate these to more approachable forms and styles. 

You can submit your work via the form below. You should receive a response from us within fourteen days of your emailed submission.

Editing Process

Keep in mind that all submissions are subject to a thorough editing process. In it, two members of our web team review and suggest changes to help make each submission suitable for online publication. Every submission goes through two but no more than three editing rounds. The editorial board reserves the right to refuse publication of an article at any phase of the editing process.

Online Submission Guidelines

Essay

We accept full papers as well as short abstracts. Make sure to follow the guidelines below when submitting: 

  • A full submission must be no more than 2500 words
    (exc. footnotes, abstract and bio). 
  • Title must not exceed 70 characters.
  • Follow MLA formatting and referencing. 
  • Mention whether this work has been, or will be, published elsewhere
    (e.g., personal blog, social media, other publishers).
  • Include a horizontal cover image with rights secured
    (copyright free images can be found on Google using the right search term, Unsplash, and Creative Commons).
  • Include a short abstract/introduction
    (no more than 80 words).
  • Add up to six keywords that contextualize the paper’s main argument
    (e.g., affect, AI, Butler, postmodernism, etc)
  • Secure permissions from copyright holders for any content that is not your own.
    (e.g., illustrations, audio, etc).

Optional

  • A short bio (e.g., artistic and/or research background, interests and practice, affiliations, links to own site or previous work, etc).

Review

Can be of a book, art exhibition, performance, event, etc. 

  • A full submission must be between 700-1000 words
    (exc. footnotes, intro/summary, and bio).
  • Title must not exceed 70 characters.
  • Follow MLA formatting and referencing. 
  • Mention whether this work has been, or will be, published elsewhere
    (e.g., blog, social media, other publishers).
  • Include a horizontal cover image with rights secured
    (copyright free images can be found on Google using the right search term, Unsplash, and Creative Commons).
  • Include a short abstract/introduction.
    (no more than 80 words).
  • Add up to six keywords that contextualize the review’s main argument
    (e.g., affect, AI, Butler, postmodernism, etc).
  • Secure permissions from copyright holders for any content that is not your own
    (e.g., illustrations, audio, etc).

Optional

  • A short bio (e.g., artistic and research background, interest and practice, affiliations, links to own site or previous work, etc).

Experimental

TEXTUAL
  • If longer than 1000 words, your piece will be published weekly as a series.
  • Title must not exceed 70 characters.
  • Follow MLA referencing.
  • Mention whether this work has been, or will be, published elsewhere
    (e.g., blog, social media, other publishers).
  • Include a horizontal cover image with rights secured
    (copyright free images can be found on Google using the right search term, Unsplash, and Creative Commons).
  • Include a short introduction
    (between 50 to 100 words).
  • Add up to six keywords that contextualize the content
    (e.g., affect, AI, Butler, postmodernism, etc)
  • Secure permissions from copyright holders for any content that is not your own
    (e.g., illustrations, audio, etc).

Optional

  • A short bio (e.g., artistic and research background, interest and practice, affiliations, links to own site or previous work, etc).
VISUAL
  • Email the original file (not just a link). 
  • Title must not exceed 70 characters.
  • Follow MLA referencing.
  • Include a short introduction that contextualizes the image/video.
    (max. 200 words).
  • Mention whether this work has been, or will be, published elsewhere
    (e.g., blog, social media, other publishers).
  • Include a horizontal cover image with rights secured
    (copyright free images can be found on Google using the right search term, Unsplash, and Creative Commons).
  • Add up to six keywords that contextualize the content
    (e.g., affect, AI, Butler, postmodernism, etc).
  • Secure permissions from copyright holders for any content that is not your own
    (e.g., illustrations, audio, etc).

Optional

  • A short bio (e.g., artistic and research background, interest and practice, affiliations, links to own site or previous work, etc).
AUDIO
  • Email the original file (not just a link).
  • Title must not exceed 70 characters.
  • Follow MLA referencing.
  • Add the required credits
    (e.g., script, recording, voices, editing, etc).
  • Include a short introduction that contextualizes the content
    (max. 200 words).
  • Mention whether this work has been or will be published elsewhere
    (e.g., blog, social media, other publishers).
  • Include a horizontal cover image with rights secured
    (copyright free images can be found on Google using the right search term, Unsplash, and Creative Commons).
  • Add up to six keywords that contextualize the content
    (e.g., affect, AI, Butler, postmodernism, etc).
  • Secure permissions from copyright holders for any content that is not your own
    (e.g., illustrations, audio, etc).

Optional

  • A short bio (e.g., artistic and research background, interest and practice, affiliations, links to own site or previous work, etc).

Online Submission Form


Copyright and Publishing Terms and Conditions

By submitting to either of our publishing channels (printed journal or online) you agree with the following terms and conditions:

  • Every online submission goes through two but no more than three editing rounds. Every journal submission goes through an anonimised selection procedure, a thorough three round editing process, and a double blind peer-reviewing.
  • The editorial board reserves the right to refuse publication of an article at any phase of the editing process.
  • You retain copyright of your work when submitting to Soapbox Journal for Cultural Analysis.
  • You grant Soapbox Journal for Cultural Analysis an exclusive right to use, reproduce, distribute, prepare derivative works of, display, and perform your submissions in any media formats now or hereafter created and through any media channels now or hereafter created. 
  • Soapbox Journal for Cultural Analysis is an open-source publisher. By submitting you grant each reader a non-exclusive, irrevocable license to download, reproduce, redistribute, and/or republish materials from your work provided they reference your work accordingly when doing so.
  • In case an exact copy of the submitted work is published elsewhere (in print, digital, or online format), you are required to credit Soapbox Journal for Cultural Analysis as the original publisher.

Printed Matter