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BOOK REVIEW: Wild Things: the disorder of desire by Jack Halberstam

BOOK REVIEW: Wild Things: the disorder of desire by Jack Halberstam

Wild Things is dedicated to the memory of José Esteban Muñoz (Queer Theorist and Performance Studies scholar) who, together with Halberstam and Tavia Nyong’o (African-American Studies and Performance Studies scholar), was also working on the concept of wildness as a concept with the potential to relieve queerness of some of its exhaustive critical and conceptual work.
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CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS: closing July 5th

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS: closing July 5th

This special issue, 'Cartographies and Constellations of Posthuman Futures', is a collaboration with Amalia Calderón & J. Bernardo Couto Soares. It is kindly supported by NICA, Netherland School for Cultural Analysis, and OSL, Netherlands Research School for Literary Studies. Contributions should be emailed to submissions@soapboxjournal.net by July 5th.
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Policing Frequencies: The UK’s 2021 Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill and the Politics of Making Noise

Policing Frequencies: The UK’s 2021 Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill and the Politics of Making Noise

In the UK, public attention has recently been drawn to the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, also known as the Police Crackdown Bill. It is the latest evidence of the authoritarian nature of the country’s current Conservative government, and is part of long running efforts by the state to silence dissent and marginalised voices from public discourse.
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Subverting the Surveilling Gaze: Counter-Forensics as Social Justice

Subverting the Surveilling Gaze: Counter-Forensics as Social Justice

While forensics is usually a normative tool of the state, Forensic Architecture subverts the visual economies of state power and renders legible the invisible. Therefore, what appears to be the impartial application of neutral expertise (forensics) is in fact an engaged civil practice.
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Imaginations, Memories, and the Pandemic: An Ode to Jean-Baptiste Clamence

Imaginations, Memories, and the Pandemic: An Ode to Jean-Baptiste Clamence

Amsterdam isn’t my Hell—it is my surreal escape from an unexperienced history handed down to me like a dusty heirloom hidden in the attic, ominously carrying its presence in an absent weight that was always there but never quite acknowledged. I felt an unexperienced postcoloniality that became conscious in my awareness of it, in a land that was once one of the biggest colonial empires there ever was.
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Reading List: Entanglements of Race, Sound, and the Archive

Reading List: Entanglements of Race, Sound, and the Archive

This reading list was compiled by organisers of the workshop Entanglements of Race, Sound and the Archive: Coloniality and the Globalised Present.
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Low-Resolutions: Alternative Self-Improvements for 2019

Low-Resolutions: Alternative Self-Improvements for 2019

To welcome in the new year, Justine Gensse and Anouk Hoogendoorn offer an alternative to the self-improvement narratives of New Year’s resolutions. Collected from students of ‘Gender, Bodies and the Posthuman’ at the University of Amsterdam, these ‘Low-resolutions’ form part of the exhibition W_show, which features work in progress from the University’s Master of Artistic Research.
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Lights, Camera, Investigation: A Roundtable Discussion on Research and/as Video-Making

Lights, Camera, Investigation: A Roundtable Discussion on Research and/as Video-Making

This article is part of the series ‘Research/Practice’, which explores the intersection of (academic) research with (creative) practice, or otherwise questions this distinction.
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Escherian Nightmare

Escherian Nightmare

Violent politics are penetrating my dreams
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Auditory Fragments from the Multitude: Reframing the Narrative Around Italian Youth Emigration (3/3)

Auditory Fragments from the Multitude: Reframing the Narrative Around Italian Youth Emigration (3/3)

In this series, Silvia Vari explores and reframes narratives about the emigration of Italian youth through the use of auditory fragments. Her “audiobiography” creates a network of different people, individual narratives, homes, feelings and voices, whose intersections and ramifications uncover a “heterogenous multitude”.
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Auditory Fragments from the Multitude: Reframing the Narrative Around Italian Youth Emigration (2/3)

Auditory Fragments from the Multitude: Reframing the Narrative Around Italian Youth Emigration (2/3)

In this series, Silvia Vari explores and reframes narratives about the emigration of Italian youth through the use of auditory fragments. Her “audiobiography” creates a network of different people, individual narratives, homes, feelings and voices, whose intersections and ramifications uncover a “heterogenous multitude”.
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Auditory Fragments from the Multitude: Reframing the Narrative Around Italian Youth Emigration (1/3)

Auditory Fragments from the Multitude: Reframing the Narrative Around Italian Youth Emigration (1/3)

In this series, Silvia Vari explores and reframes narratives about the emigration of Italian youth through the use of auditory fragments. Her “audiobiography” creates a network of different people, individual narratives, homes, feelings and voices, whose intersections and ramifications uncover a “heterogenous multitude”.
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Why Is Everyone Talking About Biopolitics?

Why Is Everyone Talking About Biopolitics?

This article interrogates Foucault’s concept of biopolitics, the meddling of politics into the biological lives of citizens, and its resurgence during the corona pandemic. She argues that biopower has evolved and has been supplemented by the digital and spread along the channels of capital, rendering the phenomenon more widespread than its conceptual revival in times of crises suggests.
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Remixing as Reincarnation: Contagious Trans*birthing in the Work of Boychild

Remixing as Reincarnation: Contagious Trans*birthing in the Work of Boychild

‘Say my name, say my name. Say my name, say my name.’
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Quintessentially Queer

Quintessentially Queer

Queerness for me, does not limit itself to sexual preference in regards to gender. Queerness for me is more so about understanding the political substantiality of your own sexual identity and the power plays, meanings and structures that can be perpetuated with its expression.
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Europe’s Paradoxical Relationship to Human Rights Laid Bare at Greece’s Border

Europe’s Paradoxical Relationship to Human Rights Laid Bare at Greece’s Border

Lynn Gommes discusses the tensions between the discourse of Europe as the ideal of democracy and the inhumane actions taking place at their borders.
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Messy Entanglements: Review "Code and Clay, Data and Dirt: Five Thousand Years of Urban Media" by Sharon Mattern

Messy Entanglements: Review "Code and Clay, Data and Dirt: Five Thousand Years of Urban Media" by Sharon Mattern

Zeno Siemens reviews Shannon Mattern’s “Code and Clay, Data and Dirt: Five Thousand Years of Urban Media.”
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The Queue

The Queue

Uncanny times call for uncanny stories.
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Sonic Acts Revisited: A Modal Play of Audio-Visual

Sonic Acts Revisited: A Modal Play of Audio-Visual

Review on the Sonic Acts Academy. Sonic Acts Academy is an annual three-day festival at the intersection of innovative audio-visual and performative art and critical thinking, motivated by changes in the ecological, political, technological and social landscape.
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Magical Thinking: Towards a Future Worth Living

Magical Thinking: Towards a Future Worth Living

Review: Sonic Acts Conference Day 1
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Letter from the Post-Human: The Fringe Benefits of Contamination?

Letter from the Post-Human: The Fringe Benefits of Contamination?

In this creative piece, Silvia Vari sheds a new light on the current pandemic. Alongside the multiple opinions taking part in the public discussion this letter adds our contagious protagonist's point of view on the epidemic. This heartfelt letter to humanity explores a different, less-human perspective on the issue.
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Wasted Vanity: A Photo-Series Exploring the Meaning of "Vanitas" in Late Modernity

Wasted Vanity: A Photo-Series Exploring the Meaning of "Vanitas" in Late Modernity

This series, composed out of the juxtaposition of three short texts and photographs, questions the meaning of vanitas in late modernity. By employing the ternary principle of reducing, reusing and recycling, it explores the ephemerality and the futility of wasted objects, while also giving them new life through their dead beauty and empty pleasure.
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Pause and Play: An Account of Multiplicity

Pause and Play: An Account of Multiplicity

Review: Pause and Play, a 1-day exhibition at NEVERNEVERLAND
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Where Is Myself?

Where Is Myself?

A Reflection on the Spatiality and Disquieting Effects of Daniël Ernst’s Virtual Reality Dioramas
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Experiencing the In-between-ness

Experiencing the In-between-ness

What do we listen to, and what do we hear when we experience a sonic liminal?
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DIS HARMONY

DIS HARMONY

Dis Harmony is both a performance and a debate. Embodying techno-sexuality, Dis Harmony is not only offering a novel approach of doing (and undoing) trans/queer erotics, but showing just how messy those erotics become when they entangle positions seen as necessarily oppositional.
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Anxious Altars: Material Renderings of Mental Space

Anxious Altars: Material Renderings of Mental Space

How do our material work spaces embody or inspire our mental space? How are these spaces entangled with the emotional labour of writing?
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Towards an Acoustemology of Time: Acquiring and Aligning an Aural Knowledge of Flows of Time

Towards an Acoustemology of Time: Acquiring and Aligning an Aural Knowledge of Flows of Time

This article is part of the series ‘Practices of Musicking‘, (re)thinking musical experience beyond limited understandings of ‘listening’. The series accompanies the theme of our new, first issue of Soapbox: ‘Practices of Listening‘.
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Singing in Silence: The Affordances of the (Im)perceptible

Singing in Silence: The Affordances of the (Im)perceptible

As part of our series 'Practices of Musicking', Zeno Siemens attunes to the non-sonic forms of 'singing' exhibited by deaf performers in Christine Sun Kim's 'Face Opera II'. These embodied, visual and spatial acts of signing and facial expressions offer a musical experience accessible only through a non-aural, embodied practice of listening.
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Learning Listening: Accent, Migration, and Separation in 'Nothing is Missing'

Learning Listening: Accent, Migration, and Separation in 'Nothing is Missing'

A shorter version of this piece is published in our new, first issue 1.1 ‘Practices of Listening’.
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Everyday Musicking 'Idiographies': Listening Through the Mundane Copy

Everyday Musicking 'Idiographies': Listening Through the Mundane Copy

This article is part of the series ‘Practices of Musicking‘, (re)thinking musical experience beyond limited understandings of ‘listening’. The series accompanies the theme of our new, first issue of Soapbox: ‘Practices of Listening‘.
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Meyhanescapes: Visualising Embodied Musical Experience in the Meyhane Tavern

Meyhanescapes: Visualising Embodied Musical Experience in the Meyhane Tavern

This article is the first in the series ‘Practices of Musicking‘, (re)thinking musical experience beyond limited understandings of ‘listening’. The series accompanies the theme of our new, first issue of Soapbox: ‘Practices of Listening‘.
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Listening to Race: An Interdisciplinary Workshop on Coloniality, Race, and Sound

Listening to Race: An Interdisciplinary Workshop on Coloniality, Race, and Sound

To accompany the theme of our new, first issue ‘Practices of Listening,‘ Zeno Siemens reports from this workshop exploring coloniality and race in sound, archives, listening technologies, and practices.
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Yours Affectively – Pt. 1: An Epistolary Exchange

Yours Affectively – Pt. 1: An Epistolary Exchange

What is affect? A deceptively simple question, without an easy answer. Or, perhaps more precisely, a question that already reduces the concept of affect to regimes of categorisation, definition, knowledge. In this epistolary exchange, which originated as an exploratory and collaborative research project for a tutorial on affect, a group of students share thoughts organised in part by this question, by thinking through and with different approaches to affect.
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Bringing Down the Master’s House: Jack Halberstam on Vertiginous Capital and Kavanaugh

Bringing Down the Master’s House: Jack Halberstam on Vertiginous Capital and Kavanaugh

How do we bring down the master’s house? What tools are available to us that do not benefit the very system we are railing against? These were the central questions of professor J. Jack Halberstam’s fourth and final keynote address of the Global Critical Pedagogies Conference, hosted by the Amsterdam Centre for Globalisation Studies (ACGS).
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Forensic Justice: 'Intradisciplinarity' and Art/Architecture for Change

Forensic Justice: 'Intradisciplinarity' and Art/Architecture for Change

A comment on the Forensic Justice exhibition at BAK.
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Amsterdam, the Magic Center: The (Lost) Art of Counterculture in the Stedelijk Museum

Amsterdam, the Magic Center: The (Lost) Art of Counterculture in the Stedelijk Museum

Amsterdam, the Magic Center – a temporary exhibition currently on show at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam – takes its name from the words of Dutch artist Robert Jasper Grootveld in 1962, who it seems prophetically predicted what Amsterdam would go onto become in the late ’60s and early ’70s. But it’s the subtitle, Art and Counterculture 1967-70, that addresses the urgency and power of the works displayed there, and their significance today.
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Conversations in Times of Crisis: Rosi Braidotti Finds Critical Theory at a Crossroads

Conversations in Times of Crisis: Rosi Braidotti Finds Critical Theory at a Crossroads

The place of critical theory now should be to find new words, a new way of using language to describe and make sense of a new reality – to make “ordinary language do extraordinary things.”
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Residues of Catastrophe: Resilience, Resonance, and Memory of an Earthquake's Vibrations

Residues of Catastrophe: Resilience, Resonance, and Memory of an Earthquake's Vibrations

Vibrations are the essence of the world of sound and fundamental amplifiers of the sonority of daily life.
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Grief and the City: Vending Objects for Mourning in Der Trauerautomat

Grief and the City: Vending Objects for Mourning in Der Trauerautomat

Zurich-based designer and educator Lea Hofer wants us to rethink the process of mourning, and how to incorporate it into contemporary urban spaces and public discourse. To do so, she turned an old vending machine into a dispenser for unconventional objects of grief – and placed it within the largest burial grounds in the city.
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Loving the Earth: Being Posthuman in the Ecosexual Bathhouse

Loving the Earth: Being Posthuman in the Ecosexual Bathhouse

In 2016, Australian art enthusiasts were given a chance to “have sex with the earth”. The so-called Ecosexual Bathhouse, developed by performance art duo Pony Express, was erected in Sydney as part of a festival for experimental art. The Bathhouse is a space where visitors are invited to interact in physically intimate ways with nature, such as through “stimulating” the insides of flowers or immersing oneself in an environment of plants, while being sensually aware of one’s own body.
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PRE-ORDER ISSUE 2.0.: CONTAMINATION

May 7, 2021
WEBSHOP

EVENT IN RETROSPECT

June 7, 2021

Clogging up the Final Frontier

On Earth, Outer Space, and Orbital Waste

The issue of outer space and orbital debris has from the outset been one of exclusion (e.g. non-spacefaring nations, women, and other minorities). However, the risk that space waste poses calls for inclusive and interdisciplinary thinking as well as a different understanding of time. This afternoon is an attempt at doing so as we engage with a journalist and poet, a space archaeologist, and a space law expert to answer questions about the future of space and space waste and our relationship to both. We’ll explore why space exploration and colonisation hold such a tight grip on our imagination, as well as issues of responsibility and accountability, and how artistic expressions (e.g. literature, performance, art, etc) can potentially reframe the dominant narrative and help create (public) awareness.

About the speakers

Alice Gorman is an internationally recognised leader in the field of space archaeology and author of the award-winning book Dr Space Junk vs the Universe: Archaeology and the Future (MIT Press, 2019). Her research focuses on the archaeology and heritage of space exploration, including space junk, planetary landing sites, off-earth mining, and space habitats. In collaboration with NASA and Chapman University, she is part of a team conducting the first archaeological study of the International Space Station. She tweets as @drspacejunk and blogs at Space Age Archaeology.

Marjolijn van Heemstra studied theology with the aim of becoming an arbitrator. Before getting there, she got into theatre which led her to work as a poet, writer, journalist, theatre- and podcast maker instead. Her poetry has won various literary prizes and her latest novel has been translated into eight languages. Marjolijn van Heemstra has been writing for De Correspondent since 2019. Her focus is on how space can help us look at the Earth differently. Her more recent book on this them, In lichtjaren heeft niemand haast, will be published later in May. She also regularly makes podcasts (Sør (2018), Stadsastronaut (2019), De Binnenbühne (2020)) in which she takes the listener along on her quests.

Frans G. von der Dunk holds the Harvey and Susan Perlman Alumni / Othmer Chair of Space Law at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s LL.M. Programme on Space, Cyber and Telecommunication Law since January 2008. He also is Director of Black Holes BV, a consultancy in space law and policy, based in Leiden. Moreover, Von der Dunk has acted as legal advisor or legal task manager in more than 130 projects, advising various government agencies and international organizations as well as a number of non-governmental organizations and industrial stakeholders on matters of space law and policy, including major space applications such as satellite navigation, remote sensing, and private commercial spaceflight. He has has been awarded the Distinguished Service Award of the International Institute of Space Law (IISL) of the International Astronautical Federation (IAF), the Social Science Award of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA), and the Social Science Book Award of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA). He was a signatory of the ‘Asteroid 100x Declaration’, together with various Nobel Prize winners, dozens of astronauts and cosmonauts, and other luminaries from the global science and entertainment community.

Kimberly Peuling (moderator) has been an intern at SPUI25 since January 2021. She is currently completing a research master in cultural analysis at the University of Amsterdam (UvA). Her research focuses on the environmental and socio-political implications of orbital debris and the imaginaries of past and future spatial infrastructures. In addition to her studies and traineeship, she is a teacher assistant at the UvA, editor-in-chief and web design coordinator at Soapbox Journal for Cultural Analysis, and a member of the events committee of the Benelux Association for the Study of Art, Culture, and the Environment (BASCE).

In collaboration with

FILM SCREENING AND PANEL DISCUSION

June 13, 2021

Geographies of Freedom

(*please note that the date above is the publication date, not that of the event)

Thursday 17th June, 18:00-20:00 (CEST)

Soapbox are delighted to present a screening of the film Geographies of Freedom developed by multimedia artist Miguel Peres dos Santos and researcher Egbert Alejandro Martina.

What is freedom and what constitutes a free life? How have architecture, the law, and geography been used to consolidate the spatiality of freedom? These are questions that are posed by the Geographies of Freedom research project, developed at Het Nieuwe Instituut. The eponymous film explores these themes by delving into the neocolonial ties of the multinational Shell and the Dutch Antilles through a compilation of archival footage.

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion with the director Miguel Peres dos Santos, Prof Dr Yolande Jansen, Dr Floris Paalman, and Mikayla Vieira Ribeiro, moderated by Lijuan Klassen.

About the speakers

Miguel Peres dos Santos (°1976, Lisbon, Portugal) is an artist who works in a variety of media. By emphasising aesthetics, Peres dos Santos reflects on the closely related subjects of archive and memory. His works demonstrate how life extends beyond its own subjective limits and often tells a story about the effects of global cultural interaction over the latter half of the twentieth century. It challenges the binaries we continually reconstruct between Self and Other, between our own ‘cannibal’ and ‘civilised’ selves. By using an ever-growing archive of found documents to create autonomous artworks, his works references post- colonial theory as well as the avant-garde or the post-modern and the left-wing democratic movement as a form of resistance against the logic of the capitalist market system.

Mikayla Vieira Ribeiro is a student, educator, translator, and poet from Curaçao, and of Portuguese-North American descent. After receiving her BA in Black Studies and English from Amherst College (USA), she returned to Curaçao to teach middle school math and English. She is now doing her rMA in Literary Studies at the University of Amsterdam where she focuses on (Dutch) Caribbean literature. She is a part of and has been highly influenced by several global grassroots communities fighting for social justice in education including Liyang Network (The Philippines and USA), Catalytic Communities (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), and Korsou Kontra Rasismo (Curaçao). Mikayla dreams of decolonial knowledge building and sharing, grounded in territory and community, especially within the Caribbean and its diaspora.

Floris Paalman is coordinator of the MA programme ‘Preservation & Presentation of the Moving Image’ at the University of Amsterdam. He teaches courses on film analysis, film history, film archiving & curating, and currently researches the archiving of political films. He holds degrees in filmmaking, cultural anthropology, and media studies.

Yolande Jansen is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Amsterdam and Special Professor of Humanism in Relation to Religion and Secularity for the Socrates Foundation at the VU University Amsterdam. She is the author of Secularism, Assimilation and the Crisis of Multiculturalism; French Modernist Legacies (2014), co-edited The Irregularization of Migration in Europe; Detention, Deportation, Drowning (2015) and recently edited a special issue of the journal Patterns of Prejudice (2020) about ‘Genealogies of “Jews” and “Muslims”; Social Imaginaries in the Race-Religion Nexus’ (with Nasar Meer). She has been teaching about political philosophy and the decolonial humanities at BA, MA and PhD levels. Yolande is currently working on a project in which a critique of religio-secular framing is connected to a decolonial approach to ecological crisis.

Lijuan Klassen (moderator) is a former research master student of Cultural Analysis at the University of Amsterdam. In her thesis, "Camouflaging Worlding in Worlds of Camouflage“ she explored the genealogical roots and speculative becomings of camouflage as a concept-object. She is committed to the more-than-human and de-colonial practices, and always uncertain about her own identity. She currently works at De Appel Amsterdam and seeks to further explore the field of contemporary art, as an in-between space for theory that is not academia.

This is a free online event but please RSVP to info@soapboxjournal.net to receive the Zoom and movie details.

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